Los Glaciares, Argentina

Overview

Los Glaciares is a spectacular national park in Patagonia that is divided into two sections. The northern part of the park is home to the Fitzroy mountain range and some of the best trekking in the whole of South America (when the weather holds!). This area of the park is accessed from the small town of El Chalten. The southern section is accessed from El Calafate and offers views of one of the most breath taking glaciers in the world – the beautiful Perito Moreno. If the stunning scenery isn’t enough, there is also the chance to see Andean condors, flamingos, Magellanic woodpeckers, and possibly pumas.

Average rating: 3.5 (good)

Average spend per person: $15 ($0 – $30)

Number of reports: 2

Best time to visit: October – April

Typical activities: bird watching, boat trip, hiking

Wildlife in Los Glaciares

According to reports submitted to WildSide, the most popular species that can be seen around Los Glaciares are as follows:


Andean condor – 100% of visitors to the area (2/2) reported sightings

Andean condor sightings Los Glaciares, Argentina, WildSide, World Wild WebHiking through the Fitzroy mountains is a great way to see condors soaring overhead. Self guided treks through the park can be arranged (for free!) at the small town of El Chalten. When the weather is clear the trails are stunningly beautiful and condor sightings are pretty common. We saw them (at a distance) every day we spent trekking – although we also spent a few days huddled indoors out of the snow. The best place to see Andean condors are the viewpoints  of Los Condores and Las Aguilas. You can also see themin the southern section of the park at Perito Merino although sightings are harder to come by and typically much further away.


Flamingo – 50% of visitors to the area (1/2) reported sightings

Best place to see flamingos, Los Glaciares, Argentina, WildSide, World Wild WebThe park supports a population of Chilean flamingos. The best place to see flamingos is in the Laguna Nimez Natural Reserve. Here they feed in the icy blue waters of Lago Argentio against a background of white-capped peaks. You can reach the reserve by walking (~ 1 km) from El Calafate in the southern section of the park. Entrance costs around $2 and gives you access to a series of well-marked trails and signs. Staff at the reserve can loan equipment such as bincoulars.


Puma – 0% of visitors to the area (0/0) reported sightings

Puma sightings Los Glaciares, Argentina, WildSide, World Wild WebLos Glaciares has the potential for supporting pumas although there are very few recorded sightings. Unfortunately, most reports we came across were from hunters. That said, there is a report of a female puma named Mocha that was born and lived in Torres del Paine National Park. Mocha became famous for having no tail and was featured in several wildlife documentaries. She disapeared from Torres Del Paine in 2014 and was reported to have been seen in some fields west of El Calafate. So look out and if you do see a puma (with or without a tail) let us know!

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